Posts Tagged ‘photography’

I was recently in North Dakota visiting my father-in-law who lives in Minot. The major winter chill has hit there just as hard as it has hit most of the rest of the country although the area has avoided much of the heavy snow. The cold (temperatures often in the low single digits) has been only part of the story in the area. The wind has persistently been over 25 miles per hour with gusts between 30-50 miles per hour. The resulting wind chill has often resulted in temperatures in the teens and twenties below zero degrees Fahrenheit.

My first photo is of a horse as it tries to get some food from a frozen field. It isn’t snowing heavily, but the snow is blowing around causing near white out conditions.

Along County Hwy 3 (Snow Day) - November 17, 2014 - 158-2

In this photo, the wind has died down for a bit. I simply liked the composition.

Along County Hwy 3 - November 17, 2014 - 001-2

After the harvest (in what appeared to be a relatively rare corn field), the cattle go through the field to eat what they can find.  Again, there was not much snow, but it was bitterly cold with the wind chill.

Along Hwy 2 - November 17, 2014 - 0019-Edit

Finally, some rays of hope — the forecast indicates warmer weather within the next week.

Along Hwy 2 - November 17, 2014 - 0067-Edit

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Although we normally have large numbers of monarch butterflies coming through our area starting in mid- to late-August last year we had very few. I was concerned that we might have even fewer given the loud noise and clouds of dust that have been one of the primary features of Maple Bluff during all of the ongoing construction. Wrongo (no need to check your dictionary, it is a made up word meaning I was totally wrong). There are many more monarchs than there were last year  and while I can’t say I’ve seen a lot of them during the heaviest phases of construction, it may well be that they were there while I was paying attention to the construction activities.  Here are a few shots of recent monarch activity.

This monarch butterfly is flying right next to our ongoing street  s

This monarch is flying right next to our ongoing construction

 

As I was writing this it dawned on me that the flowers had not been quite so bright this year and perhaps a coating of dust had something to do with that (at least between rains).

The dust may have helped to make more muted  pastels.

Dust or not, the monarchs’ appetites remain good.

Monarch in front garden - August 25, 2014 - 0014-2

 

 

 

The construction work proceeds and real progress is seen.

I am interested in patterns and repetition of forms in my photos. During a recent trip to North Dakota I ran into such patterns and repetition of form in a variety of places. Here are a few examples (natural and man made).

Rolling Hills of North Dakota

North Dakota is a far more geographically/geologically diverse state than I ever would have imagined before meeting my wife brought me into closer contact with the state.  This leads to surprising scenery if you are expecting flat lands. An oil drill is on the horizon on the right hand side of the photo.

 

 

Followers of my blog may remember that I spent some time this past winter photographing the bald eagles along the Wisconsin River in Prairie du Sac. This may sound crazy, but I took so many photos that I am still working my way through ones that I took nearly two months ago. In part this clearly show how remarkably inefficient I am at this task but in part it is because I am almost as inefficient at other parts of my life. One good thing about this is, at least from this particular perspective, that I lead a balanced life. (Is there an emoticon for a wry smile? If yes, consider it inserted here.)

Another good thing about my review is that I continue to discover some pretty interesting photos. One such is the attached “double eagle” photo. These two eagles spent quite a while flying together and at this point came close to becoming one (no Photoshop here).  It is hard to tell, but the head of the eagle that is shown is that of the lower eagle. The eagle on top is looking down and almost certainly to the left (if it was turned right, I think you would see more of its head from this angle). You can see just a touch of the white neck feathers of the eagle on top reinforcing the fact that it is lower eagle’s head you are viewing.

 

Ese’s Weekly Shoot & Quote Challenge – Wings has left me with an entirely unanticipated dilemma based on a very surprisingly realization. Until I saw Ese’s challenge and thought about it for a bit, I hadn’t realized that classifying my photos might well begin with the approximately evenly split categories “things with wings” and “everything else.” I have thousands of photos of things with wings in nature ranging from bees and wasps to butterflies and dragonflies to hummingbirds and cardinals to blue jays and bald eagles. In the wings found on machines  I have photographed hundreds of winged aircraft including the very small and slow ultralights, the tiny light sport aircraft, the very big Lockheed C-5 Galaxy and the very fast F-16 jet aircraft and things in between. How to choose?

Of course I have treated my dilemma with the solemnity it deserved and offer the following powerful message and accompanying photo to demonstrate the angst I have suffered  whilst considering this challenge.

When Donald Duck traded his wings for arms, was he trading up or trading down? ~ Douglas Coupland

 

EAA-570