Posts Tagged ‘Dragonfly’

I have had this blog for less than one year and recently I posted my 365th post so I decided to memorialize the occasion. Point-of-View.com has been pretty difficult for me. I suffer from a chronic disease that makes it hard to concentrate and to stay focused and I am often in pain and quite tired (thus the “fog”). When I started this blog I had no idea how much energy it would take and what a challenge it was going to be (thus the “war”).

I started this photo blog in part because the writing that used to come so easily to me now comes slowly and messily like the last bits of toothpaste squeezed out of the tube. Until relatively recently, I was able to work at least part-time in the career I had long pursued (I was an attorney working with intellectual property and technology law). That work is no longer available to me because it requires more energy, a better memory, and greater nimbleness of mind than I currently possess. I tell my friends that I am not dumber, but I am slower.

During the early days of my illness, boredom was a constant companion. Then, a few years ago, my wife bought me a new camera. While I had always enjoyed photography, suddenly I had a lot of time available in which to pursue it. So off I went on a photo binge. Many of my photos are taken of things very close to home – typically in our yard or neighborhood; indeed I have a category in my blog for “Photos Taken within 100 Meters of Our Home.” Many others are taken on the way to visit or at my in-laws. (My wife has a great family!)

As the years went by and the shutter clicked, hundreds and then thousands of images filled up space on my hard drive(s) and I began to think about sharing my photos. I am and always will be an amateur photographer. I do not have the energy nor do I have the desire to sell any of my work (although I do donate my work to non-profit auctions and the like).  Eventually I decided to try blogging and started start Points-of-view.com.

Keeping up with this blog has been difficult for me. What has made this easier is that many of you who have visited this blog have been extraordinarily generous with your thoughts about my photos. I am not too proud to admit that when someone says a photo of mine is “stunning” or “wonderful” or “amazing” it makes me feel good. That isn’t the sole reason for the blog, but it sure doesn’t hurt! More important for someone who had spent all too much time just sitting at home is that my blog brought me into a community of people from around the world whose blogging about their lives and travels has made boredom impossible and made frustration, fatigue and pain more bearable. While it is still so very much more difficult to write than it used to be, I have all of the time I want to do it and so it is okay.

This post contains some of my favorite photos from my first 365 posts. When I was looking through the posts to put together this collection, my biggest thought was how thankful I am that I have had this opportunity. Mostly I thank all of the people who have visited my blog. I also want to give a shout out to WordPress because I really doubt I would have had a “Post 366” had I not been blogging with WordPress, which has made setting it up my blog and keeping it going so much easier for me than would otherwise have been the case.

I hope you enjoy this collection.

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It is a little known fact that dragonflies require a regular exercise routine in order to maintain their agility and the ability to fly so nimbly. It is somewhat rare to catch a dragonfly during its workout routine since they typically do it at night in protected areas such as thickets where photography is difficult, It has been hypothesized that they choose such areas for their exercise routines in order to protect the themselves from predators such as the bat, which would naturally be inclined to take advantage of the dragonfly performing its workout routine because, as you can see in the photo below, it is in a vulnerable position. One way that scientist locate dragonfly exercise areas is based on the little known fact that dragonflies sweat profusely during their routines. Dragonfly sweat acts as a powerful attractant to bats and it is not uncommon to find  bats in a frenzy where a dragonfly thicket (almost like a dragonfly gymnasium) is located. By using detectors set to locate frenzied bats, scientist are about to hone in on dragonfly exercise areas.

Dragonfly Workout

I want to make it completely clear that there has been no digital manipulation of the above photo aside from cropping and routine clean-up. You are seeing actual dragonfly behavior in the wild. However, I should also add that to the best of my knowledge nothing in the first paragraph of this post is actually true. One has to be careful about what one reads on the Internet. I want to apologize to anyone who thought I was serious, but the photo is so unusual that I thought it deserve a good story.

Posted in Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge.

 

 

Dragonfly - A View from above

Looking down on a dragonfly that has settled on to an evergreen.

Dragonfly on Grass II

I have no idea why dragonflies would find grass interesting, but obviously they do.

Dragonfly on grass

This dragonfly enjoyed some time visiting the ornamental grasses in our garden.

Dragonfly as Easy Rider

Fun with Photshop and Filter Forge.

It was a cloudy day and this dragonfly was in a shaded place clinging to a light that is placed under the eaves of a garage. I wanted to keep the ISO as high as possible to capture the details of the dragonfly but of course that required either a wide open lens with very little depth of field (assuming a moderately fast shutter speed was needed) or a slower shutter speed to reduce the width of the aperture and get some additional depth of field. Fortunately, this dragonfly hardly moved at all. Most of my exposures were 1-3 seconds long (at f/8 - f/11) with the ISO varying from 200 to 800. My camera (Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Canon EF 135mm f/2 L USM) was mounted (obviously) on a tripod. It was triggered by remote control. Given all of that, it is rather incredible how little motion was made by the dragonfly in these photos. It is also remarkable how well the dragonfly blended into its surroundings even though there was nothing natural about them.

It was a cloudy day and this dragonfly was in a shaded place clinging to a light that is placed under the eaves of a garage. I wanted to keep the ISO as high as possible to capture the details of the dragonfly but of course that required either a wide open lens with very little depth of field (assuming a moderately fast shutter speed was needed) or a slower shutter speed to reduce the width of the aperture and get some additional depth of field. Fortunately, this dragonfly hardly moved at all. Most of my exposures were 1-3 seconds long (at f/8 – f/11) with the ISO varying from 200 to 800. My camera (Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Canon EF 135mm f/2 L USM) was mounted (obviously) on a tripod. It was triggered by remote control. Given all of that, it is rather incredible how little motion was made by the dragonfly in these photos. It is also remarkable how well the dragonfly blended into its surroundings even though there was nothing natural about them.

It was a cloudy day and this dragonfly was in a shaded place clinging to a light that is placed under the eaves of a garage. I wanted to keep the ISO as high as possible to capture the details of the dragonfly but of course that required either a wide open lens with very little depth of field (assuming a moderately fast shutter speed was needed) or a slower shutter speed to reduce the width of the aperture and get some additional depth of field. Fortunately, this dragonfly hardly moved at all. Most of my exposures were 1-3 seconds long (at f/8 - f/11) with the ISO varying from 200 to 800. My camera (Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Canon EF 135mm f/2 L USM) was mounted (obviously) on a tripod. It was triggered by remote control. Given all of that, it is rather incredible how little motion was made by the dragonfly in these photos. It is also remarkable how well the dragonfly blended into its surroundings even though there was nothing natural about them.

A closer look at the dragonfly makes it easier to see.