Archive for the ‘Pacific Coast’ Category

Two years ago my wife and I attended a wedding in the Palo Alto, California area. During a bit of downtime we took a trip over to the “7 Mile Drive,” a road that runs along the Pacific Ocean that is famous for its scenic beauty. One of the well-known scenic places along the route is called “The Lone Cypress,” which is called the most photographed tree in the world. I dutifully photographed the tree along with dozens of other people around me — trying to think of some unique angle or view but realizing that it was unlikely that any of my shots were going to be very special.  One the way back to the car, I spotted this piece of driftwood, which absolutely no one was looking at. I thought it was quite interesting but didn’t have much time to photograph it since we needed to head back to the wedding. I thought this would be an interesting addition to this week’s challenge and I hope you agree,

 

Driftwood - 7 Mile Drive

What a wonderful challenge idea Cee.

Here is my story of water – from droplet to ocean and back again. I hope you enjoy the rather lengthy journey.

The first stop is two drops of water that are held by bits of moss.

Raindrops on moss

Raindrops on moss

While much of this water will sink back into the earth to replenish aquifers or run off to do duty elsewhere, some will evaporate. Evaporated these two water drops band together with millions of billions of others to form clouds that can be jaw-droppingly beautiful.

Rural Railroad Crossing - July 19, 2013 - 73

However, those same water drops can become nightmarishly dangerous if you are driving on a rural highway in the blinding rain.

Traveling America - Downpour on Highway 2-2

Of course these water drop can also fall in the form of snow …

In the Cascades - April 17, 2013 - 43

or may become ice and form gigantic glaciers or the most delicate of structures.

Flight.

The gathering of water is among the most common sights on earth given that more than 70% of the earth’s surface is covered by water.

Water readily forms puddles …

Circlepalooza - April 19, 2013

and ponds.

Spring at Army Ammunition Plant - May 05, 2014 - 068

Left to its own devices  it will gather into cleansing wetlands.

Cherokee Marsh in the Fog - September 26, 2013 - 53

Water is the great way station and play station for a myriad of wildlife from Canadian Geese

Goose Prepares for Flight - October 02, 2013 - 68-E

to bald eagles (here an immature bald eagle)

Immature Bald Eagle - January 10, 2014 - 15

to Sandhill cranes.

Sandhill Cranes1

When the drops of water do not sink into the ground, they gather together first into streams …

Columbia River Gorge  - April 21, 2013 - 0038

that lead to great lakes like Lake Michigan

Sunset on Lake Michigan

and mighty rivers like the Columbia River

Columbia River Gorge  - April 21, 2013 - 0416

… all inexorably making their way to the oceans.

Here we see two surfers in the Pacific near Cannon  Beach in Oregon,

Surfers near Cannon Beach. OR

while the view of the Pacific in Monterey is much more peaceful.

There is a House Back There

It is in the oceans that the water, heated by the sun, drives the climate. Eventually that water freshened by evaporation raises itself again and ultimately gathers itself into the weather systems we watch for and when the rain falls we see in it our own renewal.

Self-portrait

Seventeen Mile Drive Trip - 125 - April 20, 2012

This Cee’s Fun Foto Challenge covers a lot of [resisting the pun] territory. Despite that, I could not resist adding fog and the Pacific ocean into the mix. I hope you enjoy my ground, rocks, sand, dirt, path, walk and trail leading toward the Pacific Ocean near 17 Mile Drive in Monterey.

Computer problems have made it a challenge to post anything for the past couple of weeks and continue to plague me as my machine is being repaired.  Everything is backed up but a totally disrupted workflow has made doing everything hard and finding anything tricky (without Lightroom)!

Here is a very traditional example of framing and is my entry for the Word a Week Challenge – Frame. The photo is of the Lone Cypress which can be found near Pebble Beach just off of the spectacularly beautiful 17 Mile Drive on the Monterrey Peninsula in California.

The Lone Cypress

I have had this blog for less than one year and recently I posted my 365th post so I decided to memorialize the occasion. Point-of-View.com has been pretty difficult for me. I suffer from a chronic disease that makes it hard to concentrate and to stay focused and I am often in pain and quite tired (thus the “fog”). When I started this blog I had no idea how much energy it would take and what a challenge it was going to be (thus the “war”).

I started this photo blog in part because the writing that used to come so easily to me now comes slowly and messily like the last bits of toothpaste squeezed out of the tube. Until relatively recently, I was able to work at least part-time in the career I had long pursued (I was an attorney working with intellectual property and technology law). That work is no longer available to me because it requires more energy, a better memory, and greater nimbleness of mind than I currently possess. I tell my friends that I am not dumber, but I am slower.

During the early days of my illness, boredom was a constant companion. Then, a few years ago, my wife bought me a new camera. While I had always enjoyed photography, suddenly I had a lot of time available in which to pursue it. So off I went on a photo binge. Many of my photos are taken of things very close to home – typically in our yard or neighborhood; indeed I have a category in my blog for “Photos Taken within 100 Meters of Our Home.” Many others are taken on the way to visit or at my in-laws. (My wife has a great family!)

As the years went by and the shutter clicked, hundreds and then thousands of images filled up space on my hard drive(s) and I began to think about sharing my photos. I am and always will be an amateur photographer. I do not have the energy nor do I have the desire to sell any of my work (although I do donate my work to non-profit auctions and the like).  Eventually I decided to try blogging and started start Points-of-view.com.

Keeping up with this blog has been difficult for me. What has made this easier is that many of you who have visited this blog have been extraordinarily generous with your thoughts about my photos. I am not too proud to admit that when someone says a photo of mine is “stunning” or “wonderful” or “amazing” it makes me feel good. That isn’t the sole reason for the blog, but it sure doesn’t hurt! More important for someone who had spent all too much time just sitting at home is that my blog brought me into a community of people from around the world whose blogging about their lives and travels has made boredom impossible and made frustration, fatigue and pain more bearable. While it is still so very much more difficult to write than it used to be, I have all of the time I want to do it and so it is okay.

This post contains some of my favorite photos from my first 365 posts. When I was looking through the posts to put together this collection, my biggest thought was how thankful I am that I have had this opportunity. Mostly I thank all of the people who have visited my blog. I also want to give a shout out to WordPress because I really doubt I would have had a “Post 366” had I not been blogging with WordPress, which has made setting it up my blog and keeping it going so much easier for me than would otherwise have been the case.

I hope you enjoy this collection.

Shore and Ocean - April 16, 2013 - 0228

There are places like this location on the Oregon coast where it is not always clear where ocean and shore begin and end. Streams flowing down from the hills along the shore cut wide paths through the beach allowing the salt water and fresh water to mingle. Large waves crash nearby and the ocean’s waves are readily visible here but do not dominate this enclave (at least not now). Thus, here land gradually becomes sea and sea gradually becomes land and the earth continues on its way. I hope you enjoy my contribution to this week’s Ese’s Weekly Shoot & Quote Challenge – Continuous.

“You and I are all as much continuous with the physical universe as a wave is continuous with the ocean.” ~ Alan Watts

As always an excellent photo challenge, this time focusing on the sea/ocean and what it means to us.

Wing and water

The first time I ever saw an ocean was from about 20,000 feet. (I’m just guessing; I was a kid.) My family was traveling to California on our one and only “airplane vacation.”  I was about thirteen as I stared out of the plane window at this immense, seemingly never-ending expanse of water. As we got closer I saw that it was dotted with little boats that I eventually learned were some of the very largest ships in the world. I’m pretty sure that during parts of our flight we were higher than we were when I first saw the Pacific.  Since I peered out of the window for most of the trip, it’s likely that I was able to see further than I could when I first saw the ocean.  But the scale of the Pacific dwarfed everything because it was just one thing – a unitary whole. In contrast, flying overland meant seeing mile after mile of clearly defined sections and quarters broken up by roads and cities, by long miles of fields with different colors and irrigation circles, speckled by lakes and divided by rivers and mountain ranges. In other words, the rest of the world was made of parts, but the ocean was just one thing – and that one thing was vast. While I knew from geography class that what I could see of the ocean even from way up in that plane was just a bit of the earth, I think it was then that I first really appreciated how big our planet is and how small we really are.  It was not too many years after that when I started hearing that the oceans were so big that we could dump our waste in them forever or fish this or that particular species as rapidly as possible without any problems. I remember thinking, yes, they are vast, but there are many of us and we are growing fast and if we assume we can’t do any harm, we are taking a big risk because the size of the oceans also means we don’t know much about them yet.