Archive for the ‘Digitally Manipulated Images’ Category

I realize that the background in my photo for the Weekly Photo Challenge: Silhouette might be distracting but I like its ethereal quality and the way that it mimics that same quality in the silhouetted flowers in the foreground.

Still Life Silhouette-3

Advertisements

No Meteorites

My sister (via my niece) informed me on the evening of May 23rd that there was going to be a spectacular meteor shower in the early morning hours of May 24th. Since it was a moonless night with a cloud-free sky, Wisconsin was expected to be one of the best places to see this display. While it was very difficult to do, at the appointed time (a little before 1 a.m., I packed up my camera and tripod and headed up the road that leads to the Cherokee Marsh. I wasn’t sure it would be dark enough to get good photos there, but I knew it was as far as I was going to be able to go. Also, it is on the north side of town and the meteors were supposed to be coming from a place in the northern part of the sky.

Unfortunately no one had told the meteors about the show and virtually none attended.  I’m not sure why the promised show didn’t materialize but I and a half a dozen people who had picked the same location to watch the show ended up seeing virtually no meteors – nada. Still it was a beautiful night and I could sleep in when I returned home.

I subsequently looked through all of the photos I had taken that evening. I had moved the camera around to get various views of the night sky, but a group of 38 of my photos were shot from a position that faced exactly due north. I realized this when I scrolled through them in Lightroom and watched the stars spin around the northern axis. All of my photos from that location were taken with the same ISO 1600 f/4.5  30 second exposure. My exposures covered a 28 minute time period. I wasn’t sure what I would get if I combined the photos but I figured it had to be more interesting than a photo of no meteor shower. In a twist worthy of the Weekly Photo Challenge, the combined photo of no meteors turned out rather nicely, as you can see. Serendipity is alive and well, or at least was during that meteor-free morning and as I subsequently viewed my photos in Lightroom.

By the way, this photo was created using a method that is typically used to stack star trails. In that case, the exposures are typically much longer and you would normally be taking an entire night’s worth of photos. Here is a nice article about how to do this kind of stacking using a few different methods. Since I have Photoshop CS6 Extended, it was remarkably easy. I further enhanced the image in Lightroom 5.

Building Blocks (final)

A great deal of infrastructure improvement work has been occurring in my neighborhood in Maple Bluff over the past several weeks. Part of it involves sewer and water improvements and as a result the contractor staged supplies along the construction route. Some of these supplies are large concrete blocks. To me, the stacks of these concrete blocks looked a great deal like the building blocks that children use. I decided to creatively enhance a photo of these concrete blocks to emphasize this connection and in a serendipitous twist create a contribution to this week’s Weekly Photo Challenge – Twist.

Ed at Sunday Stills has come up with a great idea — take a photo that he has published and modify it as you want to.

I have never seen a challenge like this and it was too much fun to pass up. This is going to get a little wild. I hope you enjoy the ride.

The first photo is very similar to the original. It has one obvious modification. FYI, in addition there are slow changes in the color palette throughout the six photos. Photo’s #2 and #3 show changes in the sky (i.e., including clouds; changing lighting) to add some drama. Photo #4 changes the sky from clouds into something else, something with unusual striping – striping that might be suggestive of a cage. It is in Photo #4 where it appears as though the Ferris Wheel might be having structural problems. Photo #5 shows that a transparent structure surrounds parts of the Ferris Wheel. Why? Perhaps it is there to hold the wheel together. Photo #6 is the Ferris wheel as most everything lets loose and it seems to be flying apart as a result of some type of major gravitational (?)distortion. Notice that seats from the wheel are suddenly flying and the sizes have changed.

 

#1 Ferris Wheel Fantasies - April 19, 2014 - 1    #2 Ferris Wheel Fantasies - April 19, 2014 - 2   #3 Ferris Wheel Fantasies - April 19, 2014 - 3

 

#4   Ferris Wheel Fantasies - April 19, 2014 - 5  #5  Ferris Wheel Fantasies - April 19, 2014 - 4 #6 Ferris Wheel Fantasies - April 19, 2014 - 6

 

 

The reason I like your shoot and quote challenges is that they often offer me an opportunity to think outside of the box. The challenge asks for the sources of our inspiration. There are plenty of answers to that question — everything from beauty, to grace, to patterns, to symmetry, to humor, to pathos, to joy, to the unexpected juxtaposition and on and on and on. It is pretty easy for me to find things to photograph.

One of my many sources of inspiration is the one demonstrated here — it is the ability that the digital darkroom offers me to take a photograph and use it as the beginning of a flight of fantasy with more than a dollop of whimsy. Thus it is both the photo and the power of the software tools at hand that together make one of the sources of inspiration for my photography and my contribution to Ese’ s Weekly Shoot & Quote Challenge – Inspiration.

Filter Forge Flower 2

Thought is the wind, knowledge the sail, and mankind the vessel.

~ Augustus Hare

Purple is one of those colors that I have often had a hard time with. By this I mean that a color that I might think of as purple other’s might think of as a blue or a pink. In the interest of presenting evidence of my honest confusion, here are four photos of flowers (one with considerable whimsy) in “The Color(s) Purple” for Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge. The first photo is from a neighbors’ garden; the next three are from our garden (all taken in Maple Bluff, Wisconsin where we still await a true warm spell).

The Colors of Purple2 The Colors of Purple3 The Colors of Purple4

The Colors of Purple1

Perspective is critical in photography for lots of reasons. Most critically, it is how you tell your story. The name of this blog, Points-of-View, could easily be translated as “perspectives.”

Below is a photo of part of a light that hangs outside of the garage at my father-in-law’s home in Minot, North Dakota. To most people, a casual glance at the photo doesn’t seem to show much that is very interesting.

Dragonfly on Light - 33 - July 04, 2012 (6x4 - Perspective)

If you were to have been where I was when I was photographing this garage light, you might have known that the garage light had a secret that could be better shown by a slight adjustment in my perspective (moving down and to the right, as well as zooming in a bit). Fortunately, it was a nearly windless day and nothing at all moved on to or off of the lamp as I changed my perspective to give another take on the light or rather …

Dragonfly on Light - 12 - July 04, 2012 (4x6)

the dragonfly resting on it. Sorry about the title of this post. If you only saw a garage light and not the dragonfly it might have been because the title “primed the pump” that is your mind. In other words, you were told to expect to see a garage light and that is all you looked for or saw. This is something to discuss at another time, but it is fascinating stuff.

Another way to change perspective is through the use of the tools of the digital tool box. Obviously cropping is one of the more important tools readily available to photographers. Other tools can be used to change, for good or ill, the look of one’s photo. The following is an example of how the use of filters (in this case software filters from Tiffen’s Dfx 3 collection) can change the mood, and thus the perspective of a photo.

Dragonfly on Light - 12 - July 04, 2012 (4x6) copy