Archive for the ‘Bald Eagle’ Category

Double Bald Eagle- February 15, 2014 - 2064

Few people I know think of “Orange”** when they think “bald eagles” and yet there they were — two of them orange from the cloud-filtered sun. I photographed them as they cavorted along the Wisconsin River this winter, but I took hundreds of photos of the bald eagles along the river and didn’t even look at this one for more than a month after it was taken. When I did, I did a double take. Not only did I have orange bald eagles but I had two of them, but with only one head. While a bit unusual, I thought viewers of the A Word a Week Photograph Challenge: Orange might enjoy this date with nature.

** To be clear, the beak and claws of mature bald eagles are a fairly bright orange and if you happen to be focusing your attention on either or both of these parts of a mature bald eagle, orange may indeed leap to mind.

Bald Eagles Pair

These two bald eagles appear to be very close, not only aerodynamically but perhaps in other ways as well, as they fly near each other In the Air over the Wisconsin River

I have two contributions to this week’ s Weekly Photo Challenge: Split Second Story. My first involves the immature Bald Eagle shown here and the split second is a very small fraction of one as the eagle is poised to strike the water hoping to catch its primary food source, a fish. This eagle was successful but somewhere between 80%-90% of such efforts are not.

Bald Eagles - January 10, 2014 - 235

What a wonderful challenge idea Cee.

Here is my story of water – from droplet to ocean and back again. I hope you enjoy the rather lengthy journey.

The first stop is two drops of water that are held by bits of moss.

Raindrops on moss

Raindrops on moss

While much of this water will sink back into the earth to replenish aquifers or run off to do duty elsewhere, some will evaporate. Evaporated these two water drops band together with millions of billions of others to form clouds that can be jaw-droppingly beautiful.

Rural Railroad Crossing - July 19, 2013 - 73

However, those same water drops can become nightmarishly dangerous if you are driving on a rural highway in the blinding rain.

Traveling America - Downpour on Highway 2-2

Of course these water drop can also fall in the form of snow …

In the Cascades - April 17, 2013 - 43

or may become ice and form gigantic glaciers or the most delicate of structures.

Flight.

The gathering of water is among the most common sights on earth given that more than 70% of the earth’s surface is covered by water.

Water readily forms puddles …

Circlepalooza - April 19, 2013

and ponds.

Spring at Army Ammunition Plant - May 05, 2014 - 068

Left to its own devices  it will gather into cleansing wetlands.

Cherokee Marsh in the Fog - September 26, 2013 - 53

Water is the great way station and play station for a myriad of wildlife from Canadian Geese

Goose Prepares for Flight - October 02, 2013 - 68-E

to bald eagles (here an immature bald eagle)

Immature Bald Eagle - January 10, 2014 - 15

to Sandhill cranes.

Sandhill Cranes1

When the drops of water do not sink into the ground, they gather together first into streams …

Columbia River Gorge  - April 21, 2013 - 0038

that lead to great lakes like Lake Michigan

Sunset on Lake Michigan

and mighty rivers like the Columbia River

Columbia River Gorge  - April 21, 2013 - 0416

… all inexorably making their way to the oceans.

Here we see two surfers in the Pacific near Cannon  Beach in Oregon,

Surfers near Cannon Beach. OR

while the view of the Pacific in Monterey is much more peaceful.

There is a House Back There

It is in the oceans that the water, heated by the sun, drives the climate. Eventually that water freshened by evaporation raises itself again and ultimately gathers itself into the weather systems we watch for and when the rain falls we see in it our own renewal.

Self-portrait

Bald Eagles - February 15, 2014 - 0084a

If you think a bald eagle is just a beautiful bird this photo will convince you that they are much more – they are fast and deadly predators. Here a bald eagle is eating the last of the fish that just minutes ago  it had snatched out of the Wisconsin River using those in those razor-sharp claws you see. This photo is my entry to the Sunday Stills: Dangerous Things photo challenge.

Followers of my blog may remember that I spent some time this past winter photographing the bald eagles along the Wisconsin River in Prairie du Sac. This may sound crazy, but I took so many photos that I am still working my way through ones that I took nearly two months ago. In part this clearly show how remarkably inefficient I am at this task but in part it is because I am almost as inefficient at other parts of my life. One good thing about this is, at least from this particular perspective, that I lead a balanced life. (Is there an emoticon for a wry smile? If yes, consider it inserted here.)

Another good thing about my review is that I continue to discover some pretty interesting photos. One such is the attached “double eagle” photo. These two eagles spent quite a while flying together and at this point came close to becoming one (no Photoshop here).  It is hard to tell, but the head of the eagle that is shown is that of the lower eagle. The eagle on top is looking down and almost certainly to the left (if it was turned right, I think you would see more of its head from this angle). You can see just a touch of the white neck feathers of the eagle on top reinforcing the fact that it is lower eagle’s head you are viewing.

 

The word “Contrast” is this Week’s Word a Week Photo Challenge. My photo is of a bald eagle flying along the Wisconsin River. The silhouette of the eagle contrasts with the shimmering waters of the Wisconsin River and is my entry for this week’s challenge.

 

Bald Eagles - February 16, 2014 - 2558