Dragonfly on Lightpost

Posted: February 23, 2013 in Dragonflies, Photography
Tags: , , , ,

It was a cloudy day and this dragonfly was in a shaded place clinging to a light that is placed under the eaves of a garage. I wanted to keep the ISO as high as possible to capture the details of the dragonfly but of course that required either a wide open lens with very little depth of field (assuming a moderately fast shutter speed was needed) or a slower shutter speed to reduce the width of the aperture and get some additional depth of field. Fortunately, this dragonfly hardly moved at all. Most of my exposures were 1-3 seconds long (at f/8 - f/11) with the ISO varying from 200 to 800. My camera (Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Canon EF 135mm f/2 L USM) was mounted (obviously) on a tripod. It was triggered by remote control. Given all of that, it is rather incredible how little motion was made by the dragonfly in these photos. It is also remarkable how well the dragonfly blended into its surroundings even though there was nothing natural about them.

It was a cloudy day and this dragonfly was in a shaded place clinging to a light that is placed under the eaves of a garage. I wanted to keep the ISO as high as possible to capture the details of the dragonfly but of course that required either a wide open lens with very little depth of field (assuming a moderately fast shutter speed was needed) or a slower shutter speed to reduce the width of the aperture and get some additional depth of field. Fortunately, this dragonfly hardly moved at all. Most of my exposures were 1-3 seconds long (at f/8 – f/11) with the ISO varying from 200 to 800. My camera (Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Canon EF 135mm f/2 L USM) was mounted (obviously) on a tripod. It was triggered by remote control. Given all of that, it is rather incredible how little motion was made by the dragonfly in these photos. It is also remarkable how well the dragonfly blended into its surroundings even though there was nothing natural about them.

It was a cloudy day and this dragonfly was in a shaded place clinging to a light that is placed under the eaves of a garage. I wanted to keep the ISO as high as possible to capture the details of the dragonfly but of course that required either a wide open lens with very little depth of field (assuming a moderately fast shutter speed was needed) or a slower shutter speed to reduce the width of the aperture and get some additional depth of field. Fortunately, this dragonfly hardly moved at all. Most of my exposures were 1-3 seconds long (at f/8 - f/11) with the ISO varying from 200 to 800. My camera (Canon EOS Rebel T2i with a Canon EF 135mm f/2 L USM) was mounted (obviously) on a tripod. It was triggered by remote control. Given all of that, it is rather incredible how little motion was made by the dragonfly in these photos. It is also remarkable how well the dragonfly blended into its surroundings even though there was nothing natural about them.

A closer look at the dragonfly makes it easier to see.

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